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Utah Jazz’s Kyle Korver speaks to the power of being ‘Privileged’

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Kyle Korver’s emotional and informative article

NBA: Washington Wizards at Utah Jazz Russ Isabella-USA TODAY Sports

As I’m sure many of you saw, Kyle Korver published his own article in The Player’s Tribune yesterday. He did a great job of admitting to his own mistakes and biases and just really putting himself out there. He also detailed his plans to change and encourages everyone to do the same. For today’s downbeat, I thought Korver deserved to be highlighted. To read the entire article, which I highly recommend you do, please click here.

Did you click and read it? No? Alright I’ll provide another link RIGHT HERE. Go read it.

And for those that still didn’t go read it, I’ll give you a few of the highlights here and let the message speak for itself.

When the police break your teammate’s leg, you’d think it would wake you up a little.

When they arrest him on a New York street, throw him in jail for the night, and leave him with a season-ending injury, you’d think it would sink in. You’d think you’d know there was more to the story.

You’d think.

But nope.

Before I tell the rest of this story, let me just say real quick — Thabo wasn’t some random teammate of mine, or some guy in the league who I knew a little bit. We’d become legitimate friends that year in our downtime. He was my go-to teammate to talk with about stuff beyond the basketball world...

Anyway — on the morning I found out that Thabo had been arrested, want to know what my first thought was? About my friend and teammate? My first thought was: What was Thabo doing out at a club on a back-to-back??

Yeah. Not, How’s he doing? Not, What happened during the arrest?? Not, Something seems off with this story. Nothing like that. Before I knew the full story, and before I’d even had the chance to talk to Thabo….. I sort of blamed Thabo.

I thought, Well, if I’d been in Thabo’s shoes, out at a club late at night, the police wouldn’t have arrested me. Not unless I was doing something wrong.

Cringe...

A few weeks ago, something happened at a Jazz home game that brought back many of those old questions...

The incident struck a nerve with our team.

In a closed-door meeting with the president of the Jazz the next day, my teammates shared stories of similar experiences they’d had — of feeling degraded in ways that went beyond acceptable heckling. One teammate talked about how his mom had called him right after the game, concerned for his safety in SLC. One teammate said the night felt like being “in a zoo.” One of the guys in the meeting was Thabo — he’s my teammate in Utah now. I looked over at him, and remembered his night in NYC.

Everyone was upset. I was upset — and embarrassed, too. But there was another emotion in the room that day, one that was harder to put a finger on. It was almost like….. disappointment, mixed with exhaustion. Guys were just sick and tired of it all...

There’s an elephant in the room that I’ve been thinking about a lot over these last few weeks. It’s the fact that, demographically, if we’re being honest: I have more in common with the fans in the crowd at your average NBA game than I have with the players on the court...

I realize that now. And maybe in years past, just realizing something would’ve felt like progress. But it’s NOT years past — it’s today. And I know I have to do better. So I’m trying to push myself further.

I’m trying to ask myself what I should actually do.

How can I — as a white man, part of this systemic problem — become part of the solution when it comes to racism in my workplace? In my community? In this country? ...

banning a guy like Russ’s heckler? To me, that’s the “easy” part. But if we’re really going to make a difference as a league, as a community, and as a country on this issue….. it’s like I said — I just think we need to push ourselves another step further.

First, by identifying that less visible, less obvious behavior as what it is: racism.

And then second, by denouncing that racism — actively, and at every level.

That’s the bare minimum of where we have to get to, I think, if we’re going to consider the NBA — or any workplace — as anything close to part of the solution in 2019.

So if you don’t want to know anything about me, outside of basketball, then listen — I get it. But if you do want to know something? Know I believe that.

Know that about me.

If you’re wearing my jersey at a game? Know that about me. If you’re planning to buy my jersey for someone else…… know that about me. If you’re following me on social media….. know that about me. If you’re coming to Jazz games and rooting for me….. know that about me.

And if you’re claiming my name, or likeness, for your own cause, in any way….. know that about me. Know that I believe this matters.

Those are just some snippets of a well-written piece by our very own Kyle Korver. Go read the whole article to just get a better feeling of the type of person fan-favorite Korver really is. Get a feel for what matters to him and why.

Now, I know many of you come to SLCDunk to talk about Jazz basketball and get away from some of the stuff going on the world. I get it. I’m the same way. But this was too relevant and too close to the team we love to let it go by without giving Korver’s thoughts a full highlight.

Regardless of where you stand on the opinion or Korver’s words, please be civil in your comments.

And go Jazz! Let’s get ready and excited for another playoff run!!